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Jaramar Villarreal Rosas

As a teenager, I volunteer for different environmental organisations in my native Mexico, I wanted to support actions towards the conservation of biodiversity. When the time arrived to choose a degree, there was no other option in my head but Biology. Some years later, I realised the key role that understanding human nature has for achieving conservation. During my firsts field trips as a scholar, I was captured by the Chihuahuan desert, since then I have been chasing arid environments to develop my studies. That is why most of my previous experience has been in northwest Mexico where I studied soil ecology and the influence that ecological degradation factors have on indigenous livelihoods. In that last project, I centered my attention in the evolution of the Cocopah Indigenous people's ...
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James Allan

I grew up in Kenya where I was surrounded by wildlife and the outdoors. School holidays were spent on safari game driving with clients, discussing Africa's conservation challenges around the campfire, and on walking safaris in some of Kenya's wildest and most beautiful regions.This inspired me to study a science degree, the highlight being my Honours year in Hugh Possingham's conservation lab at the University of Queensland. After my degree, I returned to Kenya where I worked for the African Conservation Centre, an NGO whose focus is on community conservation in pastoral lands studying carnivore-livestock interactions. I am now a PhD student based at the University of Queensland working with Oscar Venter and James Watson. My research interests are broad but include studying the impacts of ...
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Stephanie Avery-Gomm

Stephanie Avery-Gomm is an applied ecologist, interested in using decision science to achieve optimal outcomes for conservation. Stephanie's current research examines the efficacy of endangered species legislation and develops decision support tools to improve endangered species recovery. Stephanie is also an active member of the seabird research community. Her seabird-related work focuses on identifying the drivers of historical seabird population decline at a global scale, and how this knowledge can help to prioritize seabird conservation efforts. She is also involved in research that seeks to understand the emerging impacts of plastic ingestion on seabirds. By partnering with government agencies and NGOs in the USA, Australia and Canada, Stephanie ensures that her research is relevant t ...
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Hubert Cheung

Hubert has a passion for the mammals of the African savanna, and is particularly interested in the way modern society interacts with the natural environment. Growing up in the bustling metropolis of Hong Kong, he became very aware of anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. His doctoral research focuses on the demand for rhino horn in China for use in traditional Chinese medicine, which aims to better inform conservation decision-making. Rhino poaching has increased dramatically over the past decade and poses a serious threat to these species, making it imperative to gain an understanding of the factors driving demand in Asia. His PhD is being conducted under the supervision of Hugh Possingham, Lorraine Mazerolle and Duan Biggs.

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Colleen Corrigan

Description of work: My research interests include international environmental policy and its relationship to the local level; issues around social and ecological effectiveness of conservation management and interventions, such as protected areas; and the emergence of conservation leadership. I also explore issues around protection of marine biodiversity through connectivity, protected area networks, and criteria-based identification processes. My PhD case studies include Indigenous managed sites. As part of my ongoing work with the UN, I manage a global registry of locally managed conservation areas, a process which informs my current research. I’m currently working with Indigenous land and sea managers in an Aboriginal community on the Queensland coast at the southern end of the Gr ...
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Brendan Dillon

Brendan completed his BSc (Honours) in Zoology at the University of Melbourne and his MSc in Biodiversity Conservation and Management at the University of Oxford. His previous research has concentrated on the local adaptation of Drosophila along environmental gradients and the shifting distribution of Saharan plants throughout the African Humid Period. Brendan's PhD research focuses on i) the way that species biological traits mediate the response of mammal populations to hunting pressure and habitat loss and ii) trade-offs in the cost effectiveness of managing each of these threats and iii) integrating these insights into spatial conservation planning.

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Hernan Caceres Escobar

Hern?n is a PhD candidate investigating the topic 'Prioritisation of action for invasive alien mammals in Australia', and supervised by Professor Salit Kark. His project aims to develop a scientifically-based protocol using novel scientific tools, to prioritize actions and develop strategies that will enable to effectively minimize the threats of invasive mammals, which affect Australia's unique biodiversity and ecosystems. He will investigate the spatial patterns and major processes shaping the invasion of terrestrial invasive mammals in Australia at a continental scale, synthesizing spatial, temporal, historical, and economic data to examine the role of biological versus human-related processes in shaping invasion success and impacts in Australia. This will allow better integration of bi ...
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I am principally a Terrestrial Ecologist, but have been working in disparate fields of Biology throughout my career. Over the past few years I have been working on the history of the Macleay Museum, primarily on its natural history collections and principally on its 10,000 birds. Most of these collections were made in the 1870s, including 1000 plus along the Queensland coast and into New Guinea. I have just begun my PhD at UQ and I will be writing my research on nest predation of woodland birds. I am an external student, yet I hope to reside in Brisbane early next year. I am also the Forum Editor at Pacific Conservation Biology where I supervise papers from an extremely diverse academic assemblage, including lawyers, philosophers, biologists (all sorts), physicists and linguists. I am sup ...
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Year started2016
Veronica Fernandes Gama

Veronica completed her Honours in Biology (2009) and Master in Remote Sensing (2011) at the National Institute for Space Research in Brazil. Currently she is doing her PhD at The University of Queensland, supervised by Professor Hugh Possingham, Dr Morena Mills, Dr Simon Blomberg and A/Prof Richard Fuller. The focus of her research is to understand how migration as a trait affects species extinction risk and consequences on conservation decision.

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Diego Felipe Correa Gómez

Through my thesis project I aim to explore the relationships between biofuel production, conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. This project involves the selection of suitable areas for biofuel production using microalgae, as well as the determination of synergies and trade-offs between production and conservation. I have worked in tropical forest ecology, developed land-cover classifications and proposed biological connectivity networks. Currently I am interested in how the world can maintain its biodiversity while addressing increased consumption demands.

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Kendall Jones

I grew up in Caloundra on the Sunshine Coast, and through numerous camping and surf trips with my family I developed a great love for all things natural. I completed a dual Bachelor of Science/Journalism in 2012, followed by an honours project the following year, where I worked with the Wildlife Conservation Society to test the effectiveness of a widely used biodiversity surrogacy approach. I am now a PhD student under James Watson, Carissa Klein and Hugh Possingham. I am passionate about biodiversity conservation in general, but have a particular interest in how future land-use and climate change will affect biodiversity and people. My PhD is focused on developing conservation planning methods to incorporate climate change and land-based impacts to the marine environment. As part of my P ...
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Caitie Kuempel

Caitlin Kuempel is an applied ecologist and PhD candidate at the University of Queensland under the supervision of Prof. Hugh Possingham, Prof. Catherine Lovelock, and Dr. Alienor Chauvenet. Her current research investigates trade-offs within international conservation mandates and their potential impact on achieving conservation objectives. She is also interested in developing transparent, comparable protected area metrics, the optimal design and enforcement of conservation areas, and spatial conservation planning across the land, sea and their interface. Ultimately, her work aims to make environmental policy and management more effective by providing best-available science to inform decision making. She completed her MSc in Marine Biology at Northeastern University in Boston, MA explorin ...
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Jasmine Lee

Jasmine is a PhD student with Richard Fuller, Aleks Terauds (AAD), Justine Shaw (UQ/AAD), Iadine Chades (CSIRO) and Hugh Possingham (UQ). Her PhD focuses on conserving biodiversity in the Antarctic under climate change. In particular Jasmine’s project will look at how the distributions of species in ice-free areas will be affected by climate and other threats, such as invasive species and tourism. The next stage will incorporate this information into a prioritisation of protected areas and climate adaptation actions. Jasmine graduated from the University of Queensland with a bachelor of science in 2011. Her honours year was spent investigating the vulnerability of Australia’s threatened species to climate change. The project found great spatial variation in the different sensi ...
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Hsien-Yung Lin

Hsien-Yung completed his BSc and MSc in marine biology and migratory fish at National Taiwan University. Now, as a PhD student at University of Queensland, he is interested in the conservation of diadromous fish, as different habitat requirements during the different stages of their life history make them vulnerable to a range of different stressors and many migratory fish are under heavy harvesting pressure. Hsien-Yung?s research will include species distribution modeling specific to different life history stages, population dynamics modeling, conservation planning and land-sea connectivity for diadromous fish. Publications: H.Y. Lin, J.C. Shiao, Y.G. Chen, Y. Iizuka, 2012. Ontogenetic vertical migration of grenadiers revealed by otolith microstructures and stable isotopic composition. De ...
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Bonnie Mappin

Bonnie Mappin is a PhD candidate at the University of Queensland in School of Biology and the School of Geography Planning and Environmental Management. Her research focuses on evidence-based decision science for the optimisation of limited funds in conservation efforts for halting biodiversity loss. The main themes of Bonnie's research include restoration prioritisation, evaluation of protected areas and targets and conservation finance. Bonnie is keen to be part of the policy-science-management interface of conservation. Bonnie previously worked in financial services before switching career direction by completing MSc at Imperial College London in Quantitative Biology. Following this she has worked as a research assistant in malaria epidemiology at the University of Oxford.

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Fleur Maseyk

I work at the interface of science and policy in the applied areas of natural resource management and biodiversity conservation. My PhD thesis explored how, by targeting management actions towards natural capital stocks, we can influence ecosystem function, and thus the provision of ecosystem services and conservation outcomes. My key areas of interest are: ecosystem services; biodiversity policy; and biodiversity offsetting.

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Jennifer McGowan

I am a PhD candidate in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions at The University of Queensland, Australia. My work, supervised by Prof Hugh Possingham, Dr Maria Beger, and Dr Carissa Klein focuses on improving methods for applied conservation planning in marine and coastal ecosystems. I am interested in spatial conservation of highly mobile species and am developing methods to better capture fine-scale movement derived from satellite tracking data in order to minimise the risk of fisheries bycatch. I also assist with decision-support for several marine conservation planning projects in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy, WWF-Malaysia, The Coral Triangle Initiative and the Australian Government. Previously, I worked on identifying conservation gaps in the Coral Tria ...
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Rebecca Runting

My PhD research is focused on developing and evaluating strategies to manage multiple ecosystem services under uncertain climate change scenarios. My case study looks at preserving coastal wetlands under sea level rise in Moreton Bay, Queensland. This research has required me to draw on methods from ecological modelling, conservation planning, and operations research.

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Chris Sanderson

I am conducting research on threatened species policy in Australia. My background is in the design and implementation of field surveys, particularly for threatened species, and I am interested in the design and application of policies and legislation that impacts on how we conserve species.

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Vivitskaia Tulloch

I am interested in researching and managing the direct and indirect impacts of human-associated pressures upon marine environments and biodiversity, as well as integrated natural resource management (fisheries and forestry) across land-sea systems. The ecology, conservation and management of threatened species and how they interact within complex dynamic systems are of particular interest to me. In my PhD I have been using a combination of spatial conservation planning and ecosystem modelling to answer questions about optimal management of resources and mitigation of multiple threats in rapidly transforming or dynamic landscapes. It is important to me that my research is applicable and accessible to agencies and stakeholders involved in making conservation decisions, and I endeavour to col ...
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Ruben Venegas

My academic interests are very broad, but I am most inclined to understand the ecology of coastal and marine environments and how we can conserve and manage them. Most of my academic and professional experiences have revolved around tropical ecology, marine turtles, marine protected areas and spatial analysis. In my PhD I will work on developing an alternative approach for systematic conservation prioritization that takes into account the inherent three dimensional space of the ocean, and on trying to expand the knowledge on how to account for emerging threats to marine biodiversity while prioritizing in a cross-boundary setting. I obtained my BSc at the University of Costa Rica, and have an MSc from the University of Twente in the Netherlands.

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